Should your demand generation team be made up of millennials?

Posted by on Feb 22, 2017 in Agency | 2 Comments
Should your demand generation team be made up of millennials?

I feel sorry for millennials; they get bad press. Perhaps the worst thing about being a millennial is that they are so typecast, but it may just appear to be that way due to the heaps of content they are all ‘supposedly’ producing about themselves! At the tender age of 43, I am of “Generation X”, but before I get shot down for being too old to comment on this (or anything at all if you believe the millennial hype), millennials should, if stereotypes are to be believed, love and want to be me, as I own a successful digital PR agency. As we know, “all” millennials work or at least (should) want to work in this sector.

Wikipedia (where else would I look for this piece) states that there is no precise start/stop date for being a millennial, but sort of suggests that to qualify, births range from the early-80’s to early 00’s. For the purposes of this piece then – folk between say 22-34.

Should your demand generation team be made up of millennials? via blog.adstage.io

(Millennial members of the Tank team.)

Demand Generation professionals need…?

Demand generation is all about developing relationships with prospect customers, existing customers and evangelists at all stages of the purchase process to create a stronger sales funnel. This, in the main, is achieved by identifying targets and then creating a marketing strategy to engage with them. In other words, feeding targets with excellent, relevant content and creating relationships that, one way or another, make them feel better and more informed about a brand.

In addition to sourcing, creating and delivering factual information and advice, agencies create stories. We judge a story by asking whether someone could feasibly tell that story to their friend in the pub. If they can, it passes the test. I believe that anything that passes that test should then theoretically be content that someone would like to read (audience), publish (journalist or influencer), or share (anyone on their own personal channels).

So given that the essential hub of all content is some kind of story or genuinely useful and targeted information – is this something that can only be created by a youngish person – a millennial? Of course it isn’t.

The ability to write with empathy, cultural understanding and persuasion perhaps should improve with age. Good writing, I believe, is a combination of technical excellence and life experience. Whilst experience is not the preserve of the middle aged and beyond, the odds of having more of it are definitely on their side. The most electrifying poets may have been teenagers and twenty somethings, but a person who can excite pet owners about buying a tin of cat food with a blog, probably has a few decades of actual cat ownership under their belt. Put it another way – given that the majority of the people with the most money are (much) older than millennials, as are most of the people that procure for businesses – are millennials always best people to understand and engage with these people?

Age Diversity in Agencies

It’s a shame that there isn’t more age diversity in agencies. The first decade of my career was spent with inspirational ad creatives and copywriters who were big in the 80’s and early 90’s. I’d like to say that when I worked with them, what made them great was that they cut their teeth in the hard drinking, no rules creative environments of the late 70’s, when they were the millennials in the right place at the right time. It wasn’t. It was actually that they just knew rules of engagement backwards and could create outcomes with words and pictures – as they knew what the customer wanted and needed. Talent, age, experience and training gave them this.

Should your demand generation team be made up of millennials? via blog.adstage.io

(The entire Tank team.)

One argument for a complete millennial team is their natural affinity with the tools of technology, both social and digital. Then I remember that I, and most of my agency, were taught 90 percent of everything we know about social media and to some extent search, by a man who is at the door of 50. He in turn learnt from someone older than him, and on it goes.

I work with lots of talented millennials, or as I call them, talented people. They make up much of my team, some clients and supply partners. They are not the only people who are required in the demand generation mix, though. Whilst some agencies will obviously have a totally millennial team, there is so much need for age and experience, too. The industry does have a hell of a lot of young people in it, and some people say it’s a young person’s game, due to the energy required to keep up in this fast-moving industry. That said, most of the good agencies that I know (our own being one of them) are staffed with a fair percentage of people over 34.

So, for me at least, demand generation teams should certainly not be solely made up of millennials.

Should your demand generation team be made up of millennials? via blog.adstage.io

 

Peter Levitan’s 7 Tips for Agency Professionals

Posted by on Feb 20, 2017 in Agency, The PPC Show [Podcast] | No Comments
Peter Levitan’s 7 Tips for Agency Professionals

Peter Levitan knows agencies. He ran Business development at Saatchi & Saatchi in Europe and North America, owned his own Portland agency and was a founder and CEO of two Internet companies. We were lucky enough to have him as our guest on Episode 38 of The PPC Show.

While we recommend giving the entire episode a listen, here are the top seven pieces of wisdom Peter Levitan shared with us while on the show:

  1. “We’re in a world where specialization wins.” If you’re looking to start your own agency, know that clients are looking for specialists. We’re no longer in the grand old days where agencies were either television, print, or radio. Know your specialty and make sure clients know it, too.
  2. “The more you blog, and the more you stick to a specific subject, then the more people will find you and love you.” Sticking to the theme of specialization, make sure your company blog follows this wisdom as well. People will seek out and enjoy your content if they know what to look for and what they’re getting once they find it.  
  3. “How are you making money?” Whether you’re starting your own agency or work in an established one, make sure you can answer that important question. What’s your business plan? What is it that you’re selling? To whom? How much will they pay you? How much will you keep? About half of agencies don’t have consistent answers when faced with these topics.
  4. Run SWOT analysis with your team and then do something about it. Firstly, the exercise alone focuses the mind and can help you answer the questions in number 3. Secondly, make sure you set aside time to actually act on your findings from the analysis. Many agencies have a plan but they don’t run it. Make a plan for your business development and then be consistent about executing it. 
  5. “Your website HAS to be a sales tool.” So many agencies fall into the trap of turning their websites into fun, creative projects or brochures. While that’s all well and good, if your website is not set up to make a sale, then it’s not doing much for you. Sales is a 24-7 game now and your website is doing a lot of that work for you. Make sure it’s set up that way.
  6. “PPC works. The more you can use it, the better.” If you want to get more clients, try running PPC ads. Test the major networks – Facebook, LinkedIn – and see what works best for you. If they work, are easy, and can fit into your schedule then you have your answer. If they don’t fit in your schedule, find someone at your agency who can be in charge of them. That’s really key. If no one is assigned to be in charge of PPC, you’re not going to get a lot out of that money.
  7. “There’s a light at the end of the tunnel.” Peter is a seasoned agency professional who now runs a completely internet-based business out of his house in Mexico and is thoroughly enjoying life. You can, too!

Not enough agency wisdom? Listen to the entire episode here:

 

Want to hear more from Peter Levitan? Check out his blog (nearing 600 posts), buy his book, and follow him on Twitter.

This was our first episode of The PPC Show broadcast on Facebook Live! Join us on Tuesdays at 10am PST on Facebook to hear from the biggest names in PPC!

 

Is Net Promoter Score right for your business?

Posted by on Jan 30, 2017 in Advertising, Agency, Reporting | No Comments
Is Net Promoter Score right for your business?

I learned about Net Promoter Score in business school and, when I joined AdStage a few years ago as VP of Product, I thought this would be a great chance to put that skill to use. After all, Net Promoter Score is known as a universal measure for customer experience management. Once I went through the process of actually attempting to measure customer experience, however, it became clear that while the score might not be universally useful, the lessons learned in the process can be.

Getting to Know Your Users

When I first joined AdStage, step one was to make sure I truly understood our user base. Why do they use our product? What pain do we cure? How do they feel when they use it? That meant doing my best impression of a journalist delving into the complexities of a story. By the end of step one I had developed a true sense of empathy for our customers.

 

Step two was to go to the game film. This meant watching users as they attempted to use our product. I did this by combing through event data, user logs and even spending some time in our customers’ offices doing physical user shadow sessions.  It doesn’t take long to realize users say they do one thing but actually do something very different. Ask a user if they like a feature and they’ll confidently say, “yes.” Yet you then watch them awkwardly scan the page and it’s pretty obvious they have never used that feature before.

Once I logged enough hours I felt like I had a great grasp of their workflows, mindset and behavior.

When Companies Should Employ Net Promoter Score Surveys

Like many B2B companies, we started with a handful of customers that used our product. It didn’t take long to connect with almost all of our users to learn their stories. Fortunately, that handful of customers grew to thousands. That meant I was no longer able to personally know every single customer and their challenges. I needed to put something in place to formally collect feedback.

Along with customer feedback surveys (we use Typeform) and an analytics tool (we use mixpanel), this was when I decided to deploy a Net Promoter Score survey.

How to Set Up Your Net Promoter Score Survey

The Tools:

There are lots of tools to automate your NPS survey (we use AskNicely) so it is sent to the right people at the right time. We wait 60 days after a customer has started paying for our product. This gives our customers enough time to use the product and give meaningful feedback. Remember: you want complete honesty, not a vanity metric. We then check in with another survey every 6 months.

 

 

With a little work you can also rig your customer communication tools (we use Intercom) to generate automated responses so you message Promoters, Passives and Detractors with a relevant and timely message. In my experience about 50% of people respond to my automated email asking for more detailed feedback. You can learn how to set up the Intercom Asknice.ly integration here.

The Question Itself:

A lot of people recommend changing the wording of your NPS survey question beyond the classic “How likely is it that you would recommend [brand] to a friend or colleague?” However, in my experience, it seems like customers ignore the actual question text and just think of the 0–10 rating as a way to express general satisfaction.  If there’s one thing NPS has done, it’s created a standard feedback mechanism that users complete at a higher rate than traditional satisfaction surveys. So I feel it is better to leave the standard question so users quickly and honestly respond. Rewording the question forces people to read and think. Both things they hate to do.

Why Companies Should Employ Net Promoter Score Surveys

The classic Net Promoter Score survey is calculated using the answer to the survey question regarding likelihood of recommending your product and a 10-point scale. Many believe this to be the core measurement for customer experience management programs worldwide and it can work if you’re a B2C company with tons of engaged users and a huge sample size.

Net Promoter Score via checkmarket.com
However, we’re a B2B platform and we simply don’t have the same scale as a consumer app. And we don’t like touting data that we don’t have a high enough sample size to back. As a result, we use the Net Promoter Score survey as a means to collect qualitative feedback and as an early warning system to discover if a user is unhappy.

In the end, we don’t use the actual “score” in Net Promoter Score. However the survey and automated messaging we set up to send and manage NPS turned into a efficient way to illicit quick and honest sentiment from our users on a regular basis. To go back to my journalist analogy, it is the tip-line that points me in the direction of a user that I need to sit down with and interview.

KlientBoost’s Client Retention Magnets: How to Secure Your Bottom Line

Posted by on Dec 7, 2016 in Agency, Reporting, Search, Social | No Comments
KlientBoost’s Client Retention Magnets: How to Secure Your Bottom Line

EDITOR’S NOTE: This client retention marketing infographic is part of KlientBoost’s 25-part series. We’re super excited to partner with them so you can enjoy a new gifographic once a day in your inbox. You should subscribe here.

There are a whole heck of a lot of marketing optimization posts out there to read, but just a tiny amount of client retention posts that are dedicated to marketing agencies.

If you run an agency like I do at KlientBoost, or even work at one, then you know how crucial client retention is to the growth of your business.

With a crappy retention rate, you feel like you’re treading water.

But instead of water, you’re treading in quick sand and slowly being poked by a million small toothpicks, while elephant poop is being dumped on your head.

Client Retention via blog.adstage.io
Couldn’t find one GIF that had all three – GIF source

But joking aside, client retention is a serious thing. You’ve worked so hard to obtain a client, so why not set some things in place to keep them around longer?

That’s why we partnered with AdStage to bring you our biggest client retention lessons that we’ve learned in the two years of significant growth we’ve had (to almost $250k in monthly recurring revenue) all in one fun gifographic (with no elephant poop. Promise).

Client Retention Magnet via blog.adstage.io

Where’s The Money?

Being an agency owner, there’s a good chance that you’ve spoken with other owners about the painful things they endure.

But one of questions I often get revolves around client reporting and the amount of time it takes.

The only issue is that reporting outside of the bottom line isn’t that important. Too many agencies get caught up in reporting in metrics like CTR, impression shares, or quality scores without talking about the most important thing:

Money being made

It wasn’t until recently that we started requiring all account managers to ask that very important question to their client, which could either give a dreaded response or an exciting answer:

“Are you making more money?”

It’s too easy to get caught going through the motions or adjusting a few things here and there that have no real business impact.

Once you know that a client isn’t making more money (and you ask the question early enough), then you have enough time to make any pivots needed to get them in the right direction.

Fail to ask that question, and you’re hoping that your client is honest enough to tell you they’re not happy before they randomly stop working with you.

Just by having that one question up our sleeves, we’ve been able to catch fires way before they happen, and that has helped our retention in a very positive way.

The Four Client Phases

Once you know that a client is or isn’t making any money, the next step is to have a game plan for how to get them to make more money, again.

We decided to create four phases that all clients go through, and once they’ve graduated from one phase, the next phase has a new set of tasks we need to take care of before they move on to the next.

Here are the client phases we use at KlientBoost to identify client progress:

#1 Traffic: Nothing starts without traffic. If your client isn’t getting enough traffic, then any CRO tests you try to run are most likely going to fall on their face.

This means that the goal isn’t to try to run display campaigns to get cheaper CPCs to get more clicks. Instead, ask the client for more budget so that some quicker wins become a reality.

This is where you shouldn’t focus on the landing page.

This phase should take no more than a week.

#2 Conversion: Now that you have traffic, the next step is to generate conversions. And after that, you need to make sure that the client is able to make money off those conversions.

This is where you focus on the landing page side, and not so much on traffic side.

This phase can take one to two months depending on how many different CTAs you have to test.

#3 Profitability: Once a client has traffic and conversions, the next thing to know is whether or not they’re profitable. With ad spend and agency fees in mind, is the client able to achieve a higher ROI?

If not, then you need to figure out why and adjust. Going multiple weeks with the same traffic and same landing pages most likely won’t turn a corner fast enough.

This phase can take one to two months as well.

#4 Scaling: This is the final phase and the one that’s the most fun to get to. Once you have traffic, conversions, and profitability, the next step is to start growing the account.

Here, you’re able to start testing new PPC channels to grow the entry points of your clients funnel.

This phase can last forever and never plateau.

By knowing which phase your client is in, your account managers can easily decide which tasks to focus on for the week.

If a client is in Phase #3 and the account manager is still spending most of their time adjusting bids and testing ads, then there’s a good chance that client will never graduate to the next phase.

And if that happens, then your retention rate suffers, too.

Deep Deep Communication

If there’s a thing I’m obsessed with when it comes to working with clients, then it’s having a pulse on them.

Are they happy, sad, not confident, or excited?

But a pulse is much more than knowing how they feel about your services – it’s more about honesty and having the client feel like they can tell you anything to help both of you out.

So many clients are afraid of hurting feelings and they would rather not share what irks them. The biggest downside of this lack of communication is that you feel blindsided and shocked when they decide to stop working with you.

See, it’s easy to have your clients think you’re too busy and have no time for them, and that’s actually one of the biggest reasons they choose to leave.

Not lack of performance.

Client Retention via blog.adstage.io

Surprising, right? – image source

What I’ve also found is that clients are more than happy to give you time and are patient enough wait until you figure out what works and what doesn’t.

Once they know that you have their best interest in mind, they’ll give you more time before they cancel, because they like you.

I’ve sat in on a lot of client calls as a fly on the wall, and I keep seeing that a lot of client and account manager communication is super shallow and filled with pointless small talk.

Being honest with your clients and letting them know that you agree things aren’t doing well will help them be honest with you.

This strategy has oddly helped us have clients who canceled with us, refer people they know to work with us.

That doesn’t happen very often.

Speed, Pivots, Feedback, & Audits

There’s nothing that I value more than execution and speed. And I know it’s the same for our clients.

Having your client know that you have a sense of urgency is one of the best feelings you can give them.

Here are the four things we’ve found help our speed and retention rates as well:

Speed: The faster we can move from one campaign or landing page to the next, the faster we’re able to move a client from one phase to the next.

Pivots: This means that you need to be able to see if a campaign won’t work early enough for you to do something about it. It’s common for us to pivot once a week for a client until we’ve gained traction.

Feedback: Having regular feedback calls with a client has done very well for us. During the first month and second month mark, we have another team member (other than the account manager) call the client to get insight on what we can do better.

The most important part of this is doing it early enough in the relationship so you have time to salvage it.

Audits: This point is for the owner of the agency.

We’re coming up on our two year anniversary as an agency and the amount of changes we’ve made to our processes has been astounding.

By auditing our processes, we’ve been able to identify things like:

  • What skills do certain account managers lack so we can train them to be stronger?
  • Grouping one CRO designer with two account managers for better education transfer between all.
  • Giving every team member a topic ownership to teach all other team members about. They’re now the resident experts on LinkedIn Advertising, Google Tag Manager, or CRO tools.

Sometimes your best bet is to attempt something and then adjust. Most of what we’ve learned has come from pure trial and error.

Back To You…

The best part about running an agency and priming it for growth, is that you can split test your own company, just like you split test things for your clients.

By neglecting change, you’re not only going to continue to suffer, but you’ll eventually burn out and throw in the white flag.

Agency life is tough, but so is anything that’s worth pursuing.

I hope some of these insights can help you spark change and get your retention rate up and to the right. 🙂

[The PPC Show] Episode 33: Andrew Goodman, Founder of Page Zero

[The PPC Show] Episode 33: Andrew Goodman, Founder of Page Zero

The Latest and Greatest in Adwords News

In this episode, we were excited to talk about the latest and greatest in Adwords news with the author of one of the very first e-books on the subject, Andrew Goodman. AdStage’s Director of Product, Paul Wicker, sat down with him to talk Adwords bid adjustments, expanded text ads, the new Facebook for business teams, and Twitter’s almost acquisition.

Andrew founded Page Zero Media in 2000 in order to create an SEM firm that earnestly listened to clients and offered better services than existing offerings. After a few years of general research for a book on online marketing, Andrew honed in on Google Adwords and released the world’s first “how-to” on AdWords – “21 Ways to Maximize ROI on Google AdWords Select,” in April, 2002. And then, in 2005, Andrew published Winning Results with Google AdWords (McGraw-Hill; 2nd ed. 2008), considered the leading resource in the field. If his name sounds familiar, it may be because he’s spoken at 44+ North American SES Conferences and writes a regular column for ClickZ.com.

To hear Andrew the Adwords expert’s take on current trends in the paid advertising world, listen to the entire podcast below. Enjoy!

 

 

P.S. if you’re not following Andrew on Twitter… you should be! You can find him tweeting all things AdWords here 👉@andrew_goodman