The AdStage Guide to Google AdWords

Posted by on Jul 31, 2013 in Advertising, Search | One Comment
The AdStage Guide to Google AdWords

AdWords is Google’s online advertising platform that allows you to reach potential customers and bring them to your website. AdWords allows you to create ads for your business that can display whenever a person conducts a relevant search on Google.

Google AdWords Logo

In addition to search campaigns, AdWords also offers the ability to advertise outside of Google across its network of affiliated websites called the Google Display Network.

How Keywords Work

Keywords are the words and phrases you add to a campaign that trigger your ad to show. For example, if you deliver fresh flowers, you could use “fresh flower delivery” as a keyword. When someone searches Google using the phrase “fresh flower delivery” or a similar phrase, your ad might appear along with the Google search results.

Pricing

There’s no minimum amount that you have to spend in order to show your ads on AdWords. You set an average daily budget for your campaign along with a bid for each of your keywords. Every time someone searches on Google, AdWords runs an auction with these bids to determine which ads show on the search results page. This also determines their rank on the page.

Two Bidding Methods

  1. Bid for each time a person clicks your ad.
    This is known as a CPC, or cost-per-click, bid. This bidding method works well if you want to drive traffic to your website.

  2. Bid for each 1,000 times your ads are shown.
    This is known as a CPM , or cost-per-thousand-impressions, bid. This bidding method works well if you want to increase awareness of your brand.

Most people opt for the CPC bidding option, which means they’re charged according to the number of clicks they get on their ads. If you use CPC, the amount you’re charged per click depends in part on the maximum CPC bid you set. Generally, this represents the highest amount that you’ll ever pay for an ad click. And since this is an auction, you’ll only be charged the minimum amount necessary to keep your ad at its position on the page.

Where Ads Appear

With AdWords, your ads can appear in various places across the web. This depends on how you target your ads and the types of campaigns you create. Here are three places your ads can appear:

  1. On Google Search and other search sites within the Google Search Network  

  2. On websites that people visit within the Google Display Network

  3. On mobile phones, tablets, and computers

 

Creation

General Targeting

When creating your campaign, there are a number of ways to target your ads in order to reach the most relevant audience.

Location Targeting

Location targeting allows your ads to appear for people in selected locations. You can choose entire countries, areas within a country like cities, or even the immediate area around a specific address. Location targeting helps you focus your advertising on the areas where you’re likely to find customers.

adwordslocations

Demographic Targeting

If your products are made specifically for one gender, or if your typical customer skews heavily toward an age group, you can use demographic targeting to reach them without wasting your ad spend on others.

Language Targeting

With language targeting, your ads can appear for customers who use websites in the languages that your campaign targets. This helps ensure that your ads will appear on sites that are written in the language of the customers you’d like to reach. Since your customers may be bilingual, you may find it helpful to target additional languages.

Daily Budgets

Your budget is your daily spend limit for a campaign, so it should be an amount you’d be comfortable spending per day (or seeing on your monthly credit card bill if you multiplied your budget by 30.4, the average number of days in a month). Your ads will run until your daily budget is depleted.

Ad Groups

Ad groups are containers that hold a set of ads and the keywords (or other methods of targeting) that trigger those ads. They also contain a default bid for keywords in the ad group along with keyword-level bids, if specified.

Since ad groups live in larger campaigns, they inherit the settings and ad extensions from the campaign they’re housed in, though you can also apply unique settings and extensions to the ad group.

Learn How to Use Ad Groups to Build Relevant Ads.

Ads

Each text ad on AdWords consists of a headline, a couple lines of text describing your business, and a clickable link to your website.

AdStage Ad on AdWords

Headline

The first line of your ad is the one that customers are most likely to notice. Consider including your keywords in the headline to make it stand out because people are more likely to notice headlines that match what they’re searching for. Your headline can contain up to 25 characters.

Description

These two lines are where you describe the product or service you’re advertising. Space is limited, so choose your words carefully to highlight the most important details and benefits. AdWords allows up to 35 characters for each of the two description line.

Display URL

This line of your ad shows the address of the website that you’re promoting. AdWords lets you select a display URL to give people who see your ad a clear idea of where you’ll take them when they click on the ad. This does not need to match the actual URL you send people, so you may want to be creative.

Destination URL

This is the precise location on the website the person who clicks on your ad will be sent. People will not see the destination URL, they will only see the display URL until they click your ad.

Keywords & Bids

Selecting the right keyword list for your campaign can help you show your ads to the right customers as they search or visit certain websites. The keywords you choose should match the terms your potential customers would use to search for your products or services.

When you add each keyword to your campaign, you may also decide how much you’re willing to pay whenever a customer’s search matches that keyword and clicks your ad. This is your keyword’s maximum CPC bid. Many advanced advertiser maintain tight control over their campaign with manual bids, but many others find value letting AdWords automate their bidding for them within their daily budget.

Google AdWords Keyword Planner

Learn how to use Google’s Keyword Planner to choose your keywords.

Match Types

Match types give you control over how closely searches must match your keywords to trigger your ads. They’re an additional layer of control over your keywords that let you target the searcher’s intent.

google adwords match types

Learn more about match types here.

Optimization

Daily Budgets

When you have a limited advertising budget, you need to make the most of every dollar you spend. Rather than letting your campaigns daily budget run out every day and missing out on clicks, or spending more than you can afford, consider how you can spend your budget more effectively:

  1. You can lower your bids to reduce the average cost per click.

  2. Ensure your campaign is set to “Standard delivery” instead of “Accelerated delivery.” This ensures your budget is spread out throughout the day rather than spending as early in the day as possible.

  3. Set your bid strategy to automated bidding. This way AdWords can set your bids to help maximize clicks within your budget

Ads

To optimize your ads, try out different ad text to see which ad has the best results. For example, duplicate your first ad and change the headline to see if that works better. You can even set your ad rotation to optimize for clicks to let AdWords serve the best ads most. When you find a winner, you can test variations of that ad and pause all the others.

Keywords & Bids

You can improve your results and lower your costs by adding, changing, or deleting keywords, match types and bids. For example, if your campaign has been running for a while and your performance data shows that some of your keywords are performing better than others, you could increase your bids for keywords that convert to sales and decrease bids for keywords that aren’t converting to sales.

Visit the Google AdWords Help page for more detailed information.

The AdStage Guide to Bing Ads

Posted by on Jul 22, 2013 in Advertising, Search | 4 Comments
The AdStage Guide to Bing Ads

What is Bing Ads?

Yahoo Bing Network

Bing Ads is the online advertising platform that allows you to reach potential customers across the Yahoo! Bing Network and bring them to your website. Bing Ads allows you to create ads for your business that can display whenever a person conducts a relevant search on Yahoo! or Bing, or visits a site in their network.

Reach potential customers across the Yahoo! Bing Network

How Keywords Work

Keywords are the words and phrases you add to a campaign that trigger your ad to show. For example, if you deliver fresh flowers, you could use “fresh flower delivery” as a keyword. When someone searches Bing using the phrase “fresh flower delivery” or a similar phrase, your ad might appear along with the Bing search results.

How Costs are Calculated

There’s no minimum amount that you have to spend in order to show your ads on Bing. You set an average daily budget for your campaign along with a bid for each of your keywords. Every time someone searches on Bing, Bing Ads runs an auction with these bids to determine which ads show on the search results page. This also determines their rank on the page.

With Bing Ads, you bid for each time a person clicks your ad. This is known as a CPC, or cost-per-click, bid. The amount you’re charged per click depends in part on the maximum CPC bid you set. Generally, this represents the highest amount that you’ll ever pay for an ad click. And since this is an auction, you’ll only be charged the minimum amount necessary to keep your ad at its position on the page.

Where Ads Appear

Bing Ads on Mobile

Bing Ads on Mobile

With Bing Ads, your ads can appear across Bing and Yahoo! owned and operated sites, their syndicated partner sites, Windows 8 Smart Search results, and across computers, tablets, and mobile devices.

bing ads on desktop

Bing Ads on Desktop

Creation

General Targeting

When creating your campaign, there are a number of ways to target your ads in order to reach the most relevant audience. You can use any combination of these four targeting options:

Location

Location targeting helps you focus your advertising on the areas where you’re likely to find customers. You can choose from:

  • All locations worldwide
  • Selected cities, metro areas, states/provinces, and countries/regions
  • Near a particular business, landmark, zip code or coordinates.

Bing Ads also lets you target locations you specifically want to exclude from seeing your ads.

Day of Week & Time of Day

You may also choose the when your ads display. For example, you may only want your ads to run during your business hours. Or you find that your click-through rate and conversion rate are highest during certain times. You could then target Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM to show your ads when your potential customers can take action.

Age & Gender

If your typical customer skews heavily toward an age group, or your products are made specifically for one gender, you can use demographic targeting to reach them without wasting your ad spend on others.

Device

You may also target by device and choose to show ads to potential customers when they’re using computers, tablets, smartphones or other mobile devices.

Daily Budgets

Your budget is your daily spend limit for a campaign, so it should be an amount you’d be comfortable spending per day. Your ads are also shown evenly throughout each day with the standard daily budget. There are also two other budget options: daily accelerated and monthly. Daily accelerated will spend your daily budget as early in the day as possible and monthly will spend your daily budget as early in the month as possible. If you’re on a limited budget, you should stick with daily standard.

Ad Groups

Ad groups are containers that hold a set of ads and the keywords that trigger those ads. They also contain a default bid for keywords in the ad group along with keyword-level bids, if specified.

Since ad groups live in larger campaigns, they inherit the settings and ad extensions from the campaign they’re housed in, though you can also apply unique settings and extensions to the ad group.

Learn How to Use Ad Groups to Build Relevant Ads.

Ads

AdStage ad on Bing AdsEach text ad consists of a headline, some text describing your business, and a clickable link to your website.

Headline

The first line of your ad is the one that customers are most likely to notice. Consider including your keywords in the headline to make it stand out because people are more likely to notice headlines that match what they’re searching for. Your headline can contain up to 25 characters.

Description

These is where you describe the product or service you’re advertising. Space is limited, so choose your words carefully to highlight the most important details and benefits. Bing Ads allows up to 71 characters for the description.

Display URL

This line of your ad shows the address of the website that you’re promoting. Bing Ads lets you select a display URL to give people who see your ad a clear idea of where you’ll take them when they click on the ad. This does not need to match the actual URL you send people, so you may want to be creative.

Destination URL

This is the precise location on the website the person who clicks on your ad will be sent. People will not see the destination URL, they will only see the display URL until they click your ad.

Keywords

Selecting the right keyword list for your campaign can help you show your ads to the right customers as they search or visit certain websites. The keywords you choose should match the terms your potential customers would use to search for your products or services.

When you add each keyword to your campaign, you may also decide how much you’re willing to pay whenever a customer’s search matches that keyword and clicks your ad. This is your keyword’s maximum CPC bid. There is no automated bidding option with Bing Ads.

And yes, you can still use Google’s Keyword Planner to discover keywords for Bing Ads.

Match Types

Match types give you control over how closely searches must match your keywords to trigger your ads. They’re an additional layer of control over your keywords that let you target the searcher’s intent.

bing-match-type

Learn more about match types here.

Optimization

Daily Budgets

When you have a limited advertising budget, you need to make the most of every dollar you spend. Rather than letting your campaigns daily budget run out every day and missing out on clicks, or spending more than you can afford, consider how you can spend your budget more effectively:

  • You can lower your bids to reduce the average cost per click.
  • Ensure your campaign is set to “Daily – Standard” instead of “Daily – Accelerated” or “Monthly.” This ensures your budget is spread out throughout the day rather than spending as early in the day or month as possible.

Ads

To optimize your ads, try out different ad text to see which ad has the best results. For example, duplicate your first ad and change the headline to see if that works better. When you find a winner, you can test variations of that ad and pause all the others.

Keywords & Bids

You can improve your results and lower your costs by adding, changing, or deleting keywords, match types and bids. For example, if your campaign has been running for a while and your performance data shows that some of your keywords are performing better than others, you could increase your bids for keywords that convert to sales and decrease bids for keywords that aren’t converting to sales.

Visit the Bing Ads Help page for more detailed information.

Access Google AdWords On Your iPad with AdStage

Posted by on Jul 5, 2013 in PPC News, Search | One Comment
Access Google AdWords On Your iPad with AdStage

SEM managers have long desired a way to access AdWords on the go, but the current mobile interface, introduced in 2010, is too limited for today’s devices and the full site is severely buggy when accessed with Safari.

That’s why AdStage is offering the world’s first full-featured Google AdWords reporting app (designed from the ground up for the iPad) completely free. We acquired the app, originally called “Semply,” to push our mission to make advertising more accessible to businesses forward.

The app has been wildly successful, but have you downloaded it yet? In a little over a month after its launch, Semply reported over $110 Million in indexed ad spend and it’s currently used by over 1,500 advertisers to analyze AdWords campaigns on the go. Semply has been rebranded as “AdStage -Your Analytics Dashboard for Google AdWords” and is available in the App store.

The app is currently used by over 1,500 advertisers to analyze AdWords campaigns on the go.

google adwords on the ipad with adstageFeatures

  • Play with your data
    Looking to minimize CPCs? Increase conversion rates? Use our beautiful, interactive charts and grids to help visualize how your efforts have impacted key metrics over time.
  • Quickly check the latest stats
    View ALL important performance indicators- clicks, conversions, click-through rates, costs/conversion, etc- across your accounts, campaigns, and ad groups with the tap of your finger.
  • Optimize keywords
    With full keyword and search query data, discover which keywords are making you money, and which are bringing you irrelevant traffic.
  • Improve ad creatives
    Identify the ads that are improving your click-through-rates and see how different landing pages impact your conversions.
  • Filter by geographic location
    Is your geographic targeting too broad? Are their certain regions that are converting better than others? Find out with our geographic reports.

Available on the App Store

Download it now while the app is completely free! We’ve got some big plans for its next update– Stay tuned.

AdStage Aggressively Moves Forward With Additional Funding, Strategic Google Hires, And An iPad App Acquisition

Posted by on Jun 21, 2013 in Press Releases, Search | No Comments

One of first investments by David Sacks and Jason Calacanis’ LAUNCH Fund, two key hires from Google’s AdWords team and acquiring the first AdWords reporting app for iOS to advance the AdStage Platform.

SAN FRANCISCO, June 21, 2013 — AdStage, the cross-network advertising platform originally revealed at LAUNCH Festival 2013, announced additional funding by LAUNCH Fund, two strategic hires from the Google AdWords team, and the acquisition of the first AdWords reporting app, Semply, for iPad, aggressively moving AdStage forward post launch. AdStage has granted exclusive beta access to over 1,300 brands and businesses, allowing them to run campaigns across Google AdWords, Bing Ads, Facebook and LinkedIn from a single, intelligent interface. AdStage now adds $100,000 in additional seed funding from The LAUNCH Fund. The LAUNCH Fund was created on stage by David Sacks and Jason Calacanis in 2013. To date, AdStage has raised $1.53M in total funding. The capital will be used to develop the platform’s advanced features, expand the team and continue to bring the product to an ever growing market.

AdStage has hired two former members of Google’s AdWords team to further develop and market the platform. With the main focus on providing customers with best of breed advertising, having team members that have played key roles in these areas was vital to AdStage taking aggressive market share. Sam Mazaheri, joins AdStage as Director of Marketing and Product. Tom Chokel joins AdStage as a software engineer. After leaving Google, Chokel recently developed the Semply iPad App, the world’s first full-featured AdWords iOS app, which was acquired by AdStage.

“We’ve built AdStage to make online advertising easy and accessible to the masses. Our goal is to become the starting point for online advertising by enabling businesses to gain an instant presence across all networks,” says Sahil Jain, co-founder and CEO of AdStage. “We make sense of cryptic ad data to help advertisers optimize for their best placements. Online advertising is becoming a necessary acquisition method for businesses of all sizes. We’re making it easy by bringing everything under one roof.”

“Today, you have expensive agencies, barebones native interfaces and hard to use enterprise tools that are only accessible to top spenders. There are no simple and accessible self-serve tools to advertise across the growing number of networks. It’s a shame. We intend to fix that while also educating advertisers with the insights they need to make high-impact changes.”

AdStage also announced the acquisition of Semply, the world’s first full-featured Google AdWords reporting application for iPad. In a little over the first month of its launch, Semply reported over $110 Million in indexed ad spend and is used by over 1,500 advertisers to analyze AdWords campaigns on the go. The iOS app has been rebranded as “AdStage -Your Analytics Dashboard for Google AdWords” and is available in the App store. It will remain completely free as the company works on its next update.

AdStage will gradually open up the beta of its cross-network advertising app, AdStage Express, to more businesses, bringing the total number of businesses with access to over 1,300. The most recent release added advanced targeting support for search and social networks, previewable demo dashboards, and a number of bug fixes and performance enhancements. The AdStage team is now focusing on the product’s bold next iteration for a Summer release.

About AdStage

AdStage is a self-serve cross-network ad campaign creation, deployment and management platform. It allows you to build your campaigns once from a single interface, define your goals, deploy across multiple networks in search, social and mobile, and analyze results under one roof. AdStage optimizes your spend against your goals. Its pre-flight recommendation mechanism, ad staging, uses predictive algorithms to tell you where to advertise, how much to spend, and why before you spend a dollar. With investment of over $1.5M from Freestyle Capital, Quest VP, Dave McClure/500S, Digital Garage, LAUNCH Fund, XG Ventures,Mark Mullen and Stewart Alsop. To learn more about AdStage, visit www.adstage.io

About the LAUNCH Fund

The LAUNCH Fund was created in 2013 by Yammer founder David Sacks and LAUNCH Festival founder Jason Calacanis. It is a special purpose fund, investing only in the winners of the LAUNCH Festival, which is held yearly in San Francisco. Visit http://festival.launch.co for more information.

For more information on the AdStage app for iPad please visit: http://bit.ly/19jkJ8a

For logos and screenshots, please visit: https://www.adstage.io/press

Bing Search Share at All-Time High

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in PPC News, Search | No Comments

comScore Explicit Core Search Share Report

ComScore today released its monthly comScore qSearch report of the US search landscape for April. Naturally, Google led the market in April, but its market share slipped 0.6 points to 66.5%. Bing improved 0.4 points to 17.3% market share and Yahoo! improved 0.2 points to 12.0%. This is a record high for Bing and, given that Yahoo! search is powered by Bing, nearly a third of searches in April were powered by Bing!

It’s more important than ever to include the Yahoo! Bing network in your PPC efforts.

It’s more important than ever to include the Yahoo! Bing Network in your PPC efforts to capture new customers where they search. In fact, nearly 50 million unique searchers in the US  can only be reached through ads on Yahoo! Bing Network and not through Google search. If you’re having a tough time launching optimized search campaigns on multiple ad networks, use AdStage Express to simultaneously build, deploy, and manage online ad campaigns across Google (including Ask & AOL), Bing (including Yahoo!), Facebook, and LinkedIn!

Sign Up For AdStage Beta

Optimize Facebook & Google ad campaigns

Posted by on Nov 12, 2012 in Advertising, Search, Social | One Comment

Last week I posted some basics about launching ad campaigns and setting up ways to track my progress. This week, I want to take a look at my first week’s results and explain what changes I plan to make to optimize my Facebook and Google ad campaigns and why.

So lets see how I did in my first week:

Advertising metrics

Week 1 Dashboard

My dashboard shows some good and bad signs. Most notably, I had three conversions for the week – two on Facebook and one on AdWords. So in three cases, someone saw an ad and signed up at the AdStage homepage. That’s why I’m running these ads, so it’s a positive sign. CPA was about $12 for AdWords and $12.50 for Facebook. I think I can bring these down and analyze what impacts CPA most in coming weeks. This week, there’s no previous state to compare against. Right now my CTR appears to be low – 0.052% on AdWords and 0.03% on Facebook and clearly my campaigns on Bing and LinkedIn were not effective, thus I’ll be making changes for next time.

Here are two good Quora discussions about CTR on both AdWords and Facebook ads. Keep in mind that a campaign’s goal should ultimately be to drive conversions, and it is possible to have a high CTR without driving conversions at a low CPA.

What is a good CTR in an AdWords campaign?
What is a good CTR for a Facebook ad?

In my dashboard, I can also see best and worst performing ads, all of my top performing ads, and other high performing ads of similar companies or companies in a similar space.

Ad performance

Highest and lowest performing ads

Online ads

Other high performing ads & ad suggestions

These insights are really useful, both in making changes to my less performant ads and in incorporating elements of effective similar ads into my own ads.

Social campaign changes

In setting up my first campaigns, I wanted all ad text, headlines, and images as consistent as possible. I discovered a few differences that I adjusted for week 2. This is an issue I ran into partially because updating and adding new ads to each campaign while comparing for consistency across networks can be a pain.

For Facebook, I highly recommend using the power editor once you have more than a few ads and definitely once you have multiple campaigns. You can perform lots of useful actions that would otherwise move very slowly in the typical interface. For instance, you can duplicate ads and whole campaigns, and you can quickly edit ad details like the ad copy and images.

Here’s what the power editor looks like. You can see many options within the interface. With your own ad data in the editor, you’ll see it’s real power.

Facebook power editor

Power Editor

LinkedIn and AdWords have better interfaces and you can easily duplicate and edit your ads.

I should have also mentioned last week that you can import AdWords campaigns into BingAds. This will speed up launching your BingAds campaigns and it will ensure that your Bing and Google campaigns are the same. (I’ll warn you that Bing calls this a beta feature, and the first time I tried it, it did not work. However, the second time I tried, it did work.)

Bing Import from Google AdWords

Bing Import from Google AdWords

My next optimization was in network targeting. As I mentioned above, I had a few inconsistencies between my Facebook and LinkedIn ads. For my cross-channel campaigns, I want as much consistency as possible. Beyond the actual ads themselves, I also had targeting inconsistencies within my Facebook ads. To fix this, I took the targeting my top performing ad and made it the targeting for all of my Facebook ads. This way, I can start comparing apples to apples (ie. i can compare the ad headlines, ad text directly since the targeting is the same).

LinkedIn targeting needed a lot of change. I initially setup to target job titles and groups. This gave me an audience of about 20,000 users related to marketing and advertising. I expected my ads to be highly relevant to the audience and result in a high percentage of conversions. Instead, the audience was so small and I had hardly any impressions at all and didn’t engage any users. In week two, I’ll try targeting job function to gain a broader audience of about 1,000,000 users. Those users will still find my ads relevant, but the larger audience should result in more impressions, clicks, and hopefully more conversions.

Search campaign changes

My search campaigns also needed some optimizations – primarily concerning my keyword bids. On BingAds, I somehow didn’t change my chosen bid from the minimum allowed bid of $0.30. Beginner’s mistake! This was the first thing I did to improve my BingAds campaign. I checked my AdWords campaign’s keyword bids (which I set to auto-bid) and the average CPC was about $2.00. I switched out the old minimum bid on BingAds and matched it to my AdWords average. As I move further along, I will do more analysis on these changes and the predicted improvement I expect to see. For now, there are more obvious adjustments I need to make first.

While the auto-bidding for AdWords worked well since I didn’t know quite what to bid, it also resulted in an overpriced, low value click. Partly at fault for this click was that I included many keywords in my first week, some of which were not highly related to AdStage’s primary audience. Also partly at fault was that I did not set a bid maximum in AdWords. Specifically, I paid $4.14 for a click on an ad that displayed when someone searched for “ppc programs“. The chance of a conversion coming from that search term would seem to be very small.

Here’s a look at my week one keyword activity and my dashboard suggestions for new keywords:

There are three major lessons that come to mind specifically from week one.

  1. Pay attention to your keywords. You may find a good list or come up with your own list, but make sure most of your keywords are directly related to your product and company. Otherwise you risk paying for clicks that will not result in conversions. Google provides a good keyword tool that can help you here. You can do some simple searches to figure out possible good keywords.
  2. Make sure your bids are thought out. While you might not know anything about bids right away, there are some quick ways to learn. Bing offers good information like – whether your bid is likely to place your ad on the first page, the first ad slot, or otherwise. Set a bid that will land you the result you’re looking for. For me, a mainline (an ad placed in any position 1-4 in the top of search results) position and bid is the goal. Though, paying a little extra to guarantee top ad placement may be worth it for certain keywords. It all depends on how you much you value a given keyword. AdWords gives you less information about bidding, but a quick tip is to use auto-bidding and set a bid maximum. That way you’ll get the AdWords intelligence, while not paying more than you’re comfortable with for any given keyword.
  3. Double check your targeting. A good balance of size of audience and relevance of audience is most effective. As I saw, my relevance may have been good, but my audience (at least on LinkedIn) prevented my ads from getting enough exposure to have a successful campaign.

Those were my changes in the first week. Some of these changes could have been addressed before I even launched campaigns in the first place. This is part of the learning process and I’m already learning to take advantage of the tools I put in place specifically to help me optimize my campaigns. Hopefully pointing my mistakes out and showing how and why I’m changing my campaigns will help you build your own successful campaigns.

Thanks for reading and check out AdStage if you would like a great, simple way to compare your campaigns and get insights to improve your campaigns in one, well designed dashboard.

If you have any questions or need any help with your campaigns, please let me know. You can reach me at clark@adstage.io with anything on your mind – questions, comments, critiques, suggestions for future posts, or just to say hi.

Online advertising tools

Track ad campaigns with Google Analytics

Posted by on Nov 7, 2012 in Advertising, Search | 3 Comments

How do I hook up Google Analytics?

In the last post, I setup campaigns for Facebook and AdWords. Now, I want to hook up Google Analytics to track my campaigns. It can be a bit tricky, but it’s worth it. (Note: You will need access to your site to add Google’s code snippet required to collect the necessary data)

To find the tracking code, go to the Admin tab on your Analytics homepage (and set up an account if you haven’t already).

Google Analytics

Look for the Tracking info tab and you’ll find your unique tracking ID and the tracking code below.

Once you’ve added the code to your site you can define goals. Conversions are your overall goals for those who click on your ads. Ask yourself “what do I want someone that sees my ad to do?” You can use your answer to that question as a conversion. For AdStage, I call a conversion someone coming to the site and completing our beta sign up form. Here’s how I setup goals:

Go back to Admin on the Google Analytics homepage and click your Profile name.Now click the Goals tab. This brings you goal configuration options to actually implement your goal.

Google Analytics optionsGoogle Analytics goals

The last step is setting up a goal. There are different goal types, but in this example I’ve set up a URL destination goal with a sample goal URL of www.adstage.io. You might like to use the page after someone signs up for you site, for example: www.site.com/?post_signup. There are additional options like goal value and setting up a goal funnel, if you would like to further customize your goals.

Advertising goals

Google Analytics is a great tool, but it has some limitations. For features like intelligent insights, easy viewing of high and low performing ads, and much more, I’m now going to setup my AdStage dashboard.

How do I build an AdStage dashboard?

To setup my AdStage dashboard, you’ll need access to our private beta. Sign up here and we’ll set you up to get started. Our dashboard product is completely free. Once I have access, I fill out 10 keywords related to my company and a short blurb about my site. A good combination of specific and broad keywords will offer the best recommendations and insights. Then I can link my accounts using my network credentials. After I have picked my desired campaigns, my dashboard will be ready for viewing in minutes. Once you have access to AdStage, explore around to see all the features – you’ll find some awesome stuff!

Online advertising

And I’m done for this week! I purposely skipped over details like further customization of campaigns, ads, and Google Analytics for a couple of reasons. One, because I don’t know all the answers yet. And two, because I have already covered lots of material for these first posts.

I’ll discuss many new questions in future posts. Next time, I’ll report my first week’s results and my plans for optimizing my campaign performance.

Thanks for reading and check out AdStage if you would like a great, simple way to compare your campaigns and get insights to improve your campaigns in one, well designed dashboard.

Best ad tools