Everything You Need To Know About LinkedIn Ads

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Social | 6 Comments
Everything You Need To Know About LinkedIn Ads

As LinkedIn Advertising partners, we work with several sophisticated marketers who are truly making the most of advertising on LinkedIn. On the flip side, however, we get a lot of questions about some of the subtler challenges of running LinkedIn Ads.

People want to know: What is the secret to LinkedIn Ads? Is there a minimum time frame or test budget that must be allocated for success? How do you optimize your targeting? Why is it so “expensive?”

Over the years, we’ve hosted virtual events to educate advertisers about LinkedIn, spoken with hundreds of cross-network PPC advertisers, and worked closely with LinkedIn employees themselves to make sure we know all the ins and outs of their platform. Today, I’m sharing real questions from these experiences and real LinkedIn advertiser answers. Special shoutout to B2Linked, a LinkedIn advertising agency with whom we always love collaborating!

Targeting

 Q: Have you seen a correlation between audience size and duration of campaign that drives success?

A: When you have a large audience size and a large budget, you’re likely going to saturate that audience over the course of two to four weeks. On the other hand, if you have a very small budget, like around $50 per day, the chances of you fully saturating an audience of 30,000 to 100,000 users are very low.

Audience size and how fast you’re reaching them through your budget will dictate campaign success. If you want to roll into that backwards, I would run the same ad content over one to two months (longer for smaller budgets) and watch the performance over time.

View your click-through rate (CTR) view to gain insight into what’s happening to your CTR over time. You’ll know you’ve reached the point of saturation when you see the graph take a sharp turn downward. At that point, you’ll know that you need to freshen up your campaigns.

Q: What is the minimum audience size that’s recommended?

A: LinkedIn’s minimum audience size is 1,000, and we’ve run quite a few campaigns right around the 1,000-person size for very small niche groups. But, you’ll need to think about if this is worth your time. It’s going to take the same amount of time to target 30,000 users as it is to target 5,000 users.

And, let’s say with a good CTR, your 5,000 audience size may turn around six clicks per month. Is it worth your time having to create that campaign separately? If you look at it that way, those clicks must be worth a lot of money to be worth your time.

Q: What are recommendations for B2C targeting? How do you use the options available for targeting when you’ve got a clear demographic but it’s not tied to an occupation?

A: LinkedIn obviously lends itself well to targeting occupations, but if you know your audience well enough and that persona is very developed, you can use the business targeting for a B2C play. For example, Nissan is an active B2C brand advertiser on LinkedIn. Here’s an example of  Sponsored Content that was shown in my news feed.

Everything You Need To Know About LinkedIn Ads via blog.adstage.io

A slightly different B2C use-case is when other channels cost more than a click on LinkedIn. For example, some clicks on AdWords can be > $125 so paying $7 per click on LinkedIn, while not as targeted, could be seen as getting a huge discount.

Conversion rates can be lower with LinkedIn as you pay less for that traffic. If you can make the targeting work for you, I highly recommend it.

Q: Does overlap targeting lead to competing on your own campaigns?

A: With LinkedIn Ads, if you have any campaigns with overlapping targeting, the platform will not allow you to compete against yourself. It will take your relevancy score in a pre-auction phase from both campaigns and both ads that are competing for the impression, and will choose to serve one of them based on the auction at hand.

If you are running two separate accounts, you may be competing against yourself, but if your ads are within the same ad account, you will not compete against yourself.

Q: If I am targeting two different regions, how do I ensure my ads are running evenly in both places?

A: You can split this into two separate campaigns and then manage the budget between the two. Let’s say you’re targeting the U.S. and the U.K., but the U.S. is spending faster because there are more people using LinkedIn in the U.S. You can limit your budget separately by bidding $5 per click in the U.S. and $7 per click in the U.K.

There isn’t a true automated way of doing this to make sure impressions are split evenly, but some tools (like AdStage) allow you to set Automated Rules. For example, when the U.S. campaign has spent > $1,000, the software can automatically pause it, and wait for the U.K. campaign to catch up in delivering impressions.

Everything You Need To Know About LinkedIn Ads via blog.adstage.io

Creative

Q: Which ads are more successful for conversions: Sponsored Content or Text Ads?

A: We haven’t seen a huge difference in conversion rates between the two, but we have seen that there are certain offers that work better than others for these ad formats.

For instance, promoting content through, well, Sponsored Content performs tremendously for lead generation, but for Text Ads, we’ve seen CTRs actually decline when promoting content.

In looking at advertisers in various verticals, we’ve seen that these two products end up costing around the same amount on a cost-per-click basis for any given advertiser. So if you have a limited budget and are deciding which creative to run, I’d recommend Sponsored Content because we typically see a 10x higher CTR over Text Ads, and these units take up a lot more real estate on LinkedIn. You undeniably get more fields and a bigger image with Sponsored Content — for a similar cost per click.

Q: Do you know how LinkedIn decides when to serve Sponsored Content images as “full screen?” Is there a secret sauce for getting the ad to take up more real estate?

A: With Sponsored Content, you can either run a content update or an image update, and the only real difference is whether you’re bringing in a piece of content or the URL of an image. With the latter, you will get the larger image size and take up more real estate. However, because you’re choosing an image, you’re losing some elements that would come with a content update, such as a headline and description.

With the image update, you are only allowed an intro. We’ve heard from several marketers who are really making this work in their favor. You can optimize this by bringing in a larger image and including a link to your landing page in the intro. This can be very effective for things like infographics.

If you’re just bringing in normal content, the way the user views the content will make all the difference. If it’s viewed from the desktop, your image will be 180 pixels wide, which isn’t a whole lot of real estate. If the same ad is viewed on a tablet, however, it may be 1200 pixels wide.

So the image size will vary by device and by type of Sponsored Content. We highly encourage you to test all of the above, as different audiences will react differently to your creative.

Q: Which text field is more important for CTR and conversion rate, the intro text or the description text?

A: We recommend that you continue to perform tests using variations of these to see which is most impactful, but based on our experience, we’ve seen the most variance when testing the intro field.

With a simple A/B test of one or the other field, you can see the impact your ad text has on conversion rate. If, in your testing of the description text, you see the most variance in performance between test versions, you can conclude that description is the most important for your situation. Alternatively, if varying the intro text has the most profound impact, you can put more emphasis on that field. AdStage has a great Ad Scrambler that allows you to create ad variations at scale and compare the results.

It’s important to note that the description text is actually only displayed on the desktop. If 60% of your LinkedIn Sponsored Content impressions are served on desktop computers, that means a full 40% of impressions served (those that appear on mobile devices) won’t include the description.

The only two fields that will consistently be shown on all devices are your intro and headline, so adding a call to action in the description may not be necessary.

Q: When you change your creative, do you need to make a brand-new ad, or can you edit the content in an existing ad?

A: For Sponsored Content, you won’t be able to edit launched Sponsored Content, so you’ll just have to recreate it. For text ads, on the other hand, you can change change anything about the ad and it will reset the relevancy score.

If you change title, description or image, it will reset the relevancy score, and it should give you a fresh shot.

Bidding

Q: When starting with CPC bidding, we received a high CTR. This led us to believe that switching to CPM bidding would yield a lower effective CPC. However, switching to CPM bidding resulted in significantly lower CTR. Does this lower CTR have a negative impact on relevance score? And, if so, how do you work around this?

A: When switching to CPM bidding, if you’re not bidding high enough, your ad may not be in the first Sponsored Content slot in LinkedIn’s feed. This means your ad could have been pushed down so far as to be the tenth item in the feed.

LinkedIn’s algorithm does normalize your CTRs for this, so your relevance score won’t be negatively affected just because your CTR dropped. LinkedIn’s algorithm does take into consideration the fact that the ad was dropped down to the second position. However, a decline in CTR can make you feel like a crappy marketer so, to get it back up, try bidding higher.


Have any other questions about LinkedIn Ads? Drop them into the comments section. We love talking about all things LinkedIn!

9 Easy Ways to Automate Your LinkedIn Ads for Better Results via blog.adstage.io

Editor’s Note: This LinkedIn Ads content was originally posted on MarketingLand in June, 2015.

Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide

Posted by on Feb 10, 2017 in PPC News, Social | 14 Comments
Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide

Starting February 15, 2017, Facebook is changing its pixel game. You’ll no longer be able to create Facebook ads or track conversions with the conversion tracking pixel. While it takes a little doing to get set up with the new Facebook pixel, we think this is absolutely a change for the better – custom conversions and advance tracking – ooh la la! To make sure you have all the information you need to navigate this transition, we put together a complete guide for surviving the conversion tracking pixel deprecation and embracing the Facebook pixel!

The Facebook Pixel vs. Past Pixels

All advertisers should already be using or be in the process of migrating to the Facebook pixel in order to continue receiving the same conversion stats. In addition to keeping the conversion stats previously available, there are quite a few upgrades with the new Facebook pixel, of which you’ll want to take advantage:

  • Conversion tracking across devices: See how your customers are interacting on different devices before they convert.
  • Optimized delivery to those who are likely to convert: Show ads to people most likely to take your actions, like purchasing or filling out a registration form.
  • Automatically built audiences for website retargeting: Create Custom Audiences for people who take specific actions on your website, like visited a product page, added to cart, or purchased a product.
  • Lookalike Audiences: Know who your best customers are? Find more people who match their qualities.
  • Dynamic Ads: Automatically serve relevant and timely ads on Facebook based on user behavior, like the products people visited on your website.
  • Audience Insights: View rich insights (like demographic, lifestyle and purchase information) about the people visiting your website so you can create content that will resonate with them.

If we do a side-by-side comparison chart between the three Facebook pixels, you get the most power from the Facebook pixel with the least amount of code on your website.

Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide via blog.adstage.io

How To Migrate to the Facebook Pixel

In five steps, you can migrate your conversion tracking over to the Facebook pixel. Here’s how:

Step 1: Create Your Facebook Pixel

(You can only have one Facebook pixel in your account so if you’ve already created your Facebook pixel, skip this step and proceed to step 2.)

In your Ads Manager, you’ll see a Facebook Pixel tab where you can click Create a Pixel.

Note: You can have only one pixel per ad account, so name the pixel in a way that represents your business (though you can change the name of the pixel at any time from the Facebook Pixel tab). Once you accept the terms, you can create the pixel.

Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide via blog.adstage.io

Step 2: Implement Your Facebook Pixel

The Facebook pixel code has two main elements:

  • Pixel base code: Must be added on every page of your website to track activity or events on your website.
  • Event code: Tracks any paid (Facebook ads) or unpaid (organic reach) actions that happen on your website, so you can use that data for advertising

There are nine predefined or standard events for which Facebook automatically tracks and optimizes your ads. Previously, you had a unique conversion pixel ID per action, like a purchase. Now, you’ll only need one ID per account and you can differentiate between actions with different event codes. Using the table below, place the appropriate standard event code anywhere you had previously used the conversion tracking pixel:

Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide via blog.adstage.io

Step 3: Check Your Implementation

After you’ve mapped your events, double-check these areas to make sure everything is tracking correctly on your Facebook dashboard, and cross reference with your conversion tracking pixel data:

  • Is your Facebook pixel active and sending traffic consistently?
  • Is the overall volume of traffic from your conversion tracking pixels about the same as that of your Facebook pixel for the same time period?
  • Is the volume of conversions for each of your types of conversion tracking pixels the same as the volume of conversions for each corresponding standard event?

Step 4: Transition Your Ads

Once you’ve verified that the Facebook pixel is accurately tracking volume, it’s time to migrate your ads over. To transition your existing ad sets to tracking with a Facebook pixel only, go to Ads Manager or Power Editor and locate the ads you wish to update. When you’re in the edit view, go to the Pixel Tracking section and select “Track all conversions from my Facebook pixel” — don’t forget to save and close.

In addition, you’ll want to modify your existing ad sets’ optimization to use the Facebook pixel. Facebook recommends shifting only a small portion of your budget into a new ad set optimizing through the Facebook pixel to start. These ad sets can gather the necessary data for successful full-scale Facebook pixel optimization and as you build up data and feel more comfortable and confident, modify the rest of your existing ad sets.

Go to your Ads Manager or Power Editor and find the ad sets you wish to edit. In the “Optimize For a Conversion” section in the editing window, click the X in the “Conversion Event” field and choose a new Facebook pixel conversion from the dropdown — don’t forget to click Save and Close.

Facebook Pixel Adoption: The Ultimate Transition Guide via blog.adstage.io

Bonus: If you’re an AdStage Report user, here’s how to bring those custom conversions into your Report dashboard.

Step 5: Remove Your Conversion Tracking Pixel Code

Once you’ve implemented the Facebook pixel code and transitioned your ads and ad sets to the Facebook pixel, you can remove the conversion pixel code from your website. However, make sure your conversion tracking pixel isn’t being used for optimization or tracking for any active campaigns before you do this.


Remember the Conversion Tracking Pixel will no longer be supported on February 15, 2017 so don’t delay on these updates. Happy advertising!

The Rise of Social Media in Super Bowl Advertising

Posted by on Feb 7, 2017 in PPC News, Search, Social | 9 Comments
The Rise of Social Media in Super Bowl Advertising

Sahil Jain, CEO and Co-Founder of AdStage, circled up with CGTN America this week to talk Super Bowl advertising hits and misses, and the role of digital marketing in live television today.

Q: How important are Super Bowl TV and online ads today vs a decade ago?

SJ: Studies show that say 87% of people have a second screen in front of them while they’re watching these games/events or just television in general. 64% are using social media while they’re watching TV. This year, you’re going to start seeing, for the first time ever, digital advertising eclipse TV advertising. But, it’s not doom and gloom for television advertising. In fact, it’s the opposite. Its that digital advertising, television – all these different mediums – are more effective when you use them together – when there’s a holistic strategy in place. You really saw this with Airbnb’s Super Bowl ad where they had the #weaccept hashtag at the end. They knew the Super Bowl audience was going to be on their phones.

Q: Super Bowl ads are no small investment – in fact, they hit 5 million dollars this year. So with so many other ways to attract consumers, is it still worth the investment?

SJ: The name of the game is really elevation across all fronts. Studies are starting to say that television ads will lead to larger social engagement. So if you show a television ad, you’ll see increased engagement on facebook, twitter, etc.

You’re starting to see some more well-funded tech companies taking out Super Bowl ads – you saw Google, you saw Amazon – the two artificial intelligence battlers, and you saw newcomers like Airbnb. That’s just a testament to this medium being alive and well, regardless of the price tag.

Q: Any Super Bowl advertising surprises this year? Big hits and misses?

SJ: You saw for the first time, in a really strong way, these brands using their voice and power to bring attention to things happening currently in the political climate. In the end, brands are still looking for greater sales and bigger purchases, but we can’t forget what Coca Cola did with the Share a Coke campaign – teaching us that there’s some sort of altruistic behavior that you can marry with your business goals. You saw this with Anheuser Busch – it was really beautifully done – almost like a movie or a television show we were watching on Netflix.

Check out the full interview below!

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017

Posted by on Jan 27, 2017 in Automation, Search, Social | One Comment
7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017

As PPC professionals, we’re always looking for ways to increase productivity and campaign performance. In 2017, automating PPC ads is going to be our top tactic for getting the most out of our ads with the least time spent (we don’t just sell PPC automation tools – we practice what we preach). We know a lot of people have questions when it comes to PPC automation, so in this post, we’ll be covering the top seven reasons everyone should be automating campaign optimization this year.

1. Automated Bidding

Google AdWords and Facebook Ads both have a number of bidding options. And, if you haven’t tried them yet, you’re missing out. Managing your bids manually is not only time-consuming, but may not be in your best interest based on your campaign goals.

Within Google AdWords, we recommend using the CPA bidding option. This will help maximize your conversions, unlike CPC or CPM bidding, which optimizes for clicks or impressions, respectively. Because search queries and impressions occur in real-time, it’s unrealistic for a human campaign manager to continuously monitor and update bids around the clock. You can select your bid strategy at the campaign level and the ad group level within AdWords, but the ad group setting will supersede the campaign settings.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

Facebook is slightly different since the campaigns you build on the social network are objective-based. Based on your campaign objective, Facebook will automatically optimize bids for the end goal if you select automatic bidding. Unlike a one-time bid update, Facebook’s automatic bidding algorithms are constantly optimizing and iterating your bids 24/7 to deliver the maximum number of results. Automatic bidding is set at the Facebook ad set level within your Ads Manager.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

2. Campaign Scheduling / Dayparting

If you managed a retail shoe store, and you knew more shoppers came on the weekends, you would schedule more onsite team members on those days, right? Likewise, if you’re a restaurant owner and you know when the popular meal times are, you’re going to have more cooks and waiters on the schedule. You can think of campaign scheduling the same way.

If you’re tracking your conversions through Google Analytics (which I hope you are!), you already know which days of the week and even which hours of the day are going to yield the most conversions. Alleviate the need to manually pause and start campaigns by scheduling your ad delivery times and days. Campaign scheduling optimizes your budget, stretching it to drive more conversions during the most competitive hours of the day.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

3. Account & Campaign Budget Monitoring

To combat over or under-pacing, you should monitor your spend trends. However, this attention to detail is often very manual and time consuming. By implementing rules through an automated monitoring system, you can receive alerts when the system is noticing changes in performance and then reallocate budgets automatically.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

4. Standardize, Automate, and Schedule Your Reporting

Reporting is inevitable. Especially when you’re spending thousands, if not millions of dollars across multiple traffic sources. The more sources you test, the more cumbersome reporting gets, so find a system that helps you automate elements of the PPC reporting process. Here’s an example from AdStage Report:

Create a standardized template for your report by adding interactive elements, custom views, and branding.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

From there, you can refresh and send yourself and your team the report on your desired cadence.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

5. Automatically Pause Underperforming Creative

Automated rules that are unbiased and impact your cost per conversion can go a long way in making sure that your are putting your best creatives forward. For example, PPC automation allows you to pause ads that have high impressions and clicks, but no historic conversions, or pause ads that have significant historical data, but high CPAs.

6. Receive Alerts for Performance Trends You Care About

Rather than manually having to check your campaign performance every day or every week, automate this task with an alert. This means you will get a message pointing out any campaigns or targeting settings that are jeopardizing performance. For example, get notified when your campaigns, ad groups or ad sets have a low CTRs or high CPAs.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

7. Automate A/B Testing

Creative testing has a scientific element to it that is prone to human error or biases. There are rarely any marketers conducting purely manual A/B tests. When using an automated system to A/B test your ad creatives, you can set up the parameters and let an algorithm decide the true winner. It will tell you which ad creative is winning based on the performance metrics you care about the most and you can swap in a new ad for ongoing A/B tests and incremental boosts in performance over time.


Obviously, we’re biased when it comes to PPC automation – we love it so much we’ve made a whole product for it. If you have questions about how AdStage Automate might work for you, start a 14-Day Free Trial or request a demo.

7 Reasons You Need to Automate Your Ads in 2017 via blog.adstage.io

 

Facebook Releases In-Stream Video Ads as a Placement

Posted by on Jan 13, 2017 in PPC News, Social | No Comments
Facebook Releases In-Stream Video Ads as a Placement

Facebook is enhancing its Audience Network with its latest release of In-Stream Video Ads. This added placement is not only for mobile, but also available on desktop as well. From a user experience standpoint, the end user will be able to view the video ad in one of two ways: in-stream or in-article.

In-Stream Video Ads

The in-stream video ads, available both on mobile and desktop, will deliver in pre-roll, mid-roll and post-roll settings on video publishers that have in-stream inventory. If you’re wondering what type of third-party placements you can expect, premium publishers such as USA Today, Sports Media Group, and Daily Mail are already using these new ad formats to deliver engaging video ad experiences to their audiences. Other premium publishers may be available in the closed beta, but eventually Facebook will be rolling this out more broadly. Here’s an example of a video ad shown on USA Today:

In-stream video ad in the Audience Network (desktop + mobile)Advertisers can now optimize their video ads for brand awareness through the Audience Network. In-stream video ads will play before, during or after video content on third party apps and sites across mobile and desktop.

Posted by Facebook Business on Thursday, May 12, 2016

In-Article Video Ads

In-article video ads are currently shown on Facebook’s Instant Articles, a solution that lets publishers show articles from their site or mobile app to their audience on Facebook. The video ads will appear between paragraphs of text articles on mobile and play automatically when at least 50% of pixels are viewable. Viewers can opt-in for sound if they choose, but the default is muted. If you’re wondering what type of placements to expect, the in-article placements are only available through Facebook Instant Articles at this time. This means any publisher that already uses Instant Articles could enable this placement to show your video ads.

In-article video ad in the Audience Network (mobile)Advertisers can now optimize their video ads for brand awareness through the Audience Network. In–article video ads will appear between paragraphs of text and play automatically when at least half the pixels are viewable. Viewers must opt-in to sound.Posted by Facebook Business on Thursday, May 12, 2016

Getting Started

To start syndicating your video ads on third-party publishers, head to your Facebook Ads Manager. Within your Video Views campaign, you will see an option to Edit Placements. Make sure you’ve checked the box called “Audience Network” to qualify for additional reach and frequency across other publishers outside of Facebook.

Facebook Releases In-Stream Video Ads via blog.adstage.io

According to Facebook, advertisers that opt in to the Audience Network can generate approximately 10% more incremental reach than if they only targeted the mobile News Feed (Facebook internal data, May 2016). Early tests are also showing a lower cost per view (CPV) when advertisers enable video ads on all of their properties including Facebook, Instagram, and the Audience Network.

The algorithms will increase in-stream video ad delivery on a third-party site or app if it is deemed more relevant to a viewer. This means, for example, if your targeted audience spends more time in a particular app or website outside of Facebook or Instagram, your video will be shown on that publisher more often. With more places to deliver content, advertisers can maximize their brand exposure through video ads more seamlessly through Facebook. Have you tried In-Stream Video Ads on the Audience Network yet? Tell us about your experience in the comments section below!

What every PPC professional should do to prepare for 2017

Posted by on Jan 7, 2017 in PPC News, Search, Social | 5 Comments
What every PPC professional should do to prepare for 2017

We started off 2017 with some expert predictions about what the new year will have in store for PPC. But all the buzz about trends and innovations can be pretty overwhelming without actionable steps to not just prepare for 2017, but stay ahead of the PPC curve.

In their webinar on PPC predictions for 2017, our very own Mike McEuen teamed up with JD Prater and Matt Umbro of Hanapin Marketing to talk about what’s coming down the pipeline for Search, Social, and Ad Tech and what you can do to stay ahead. We pulled out their most actionable tips, so you can get to work (after all, 2017 is already rolling right along…):

Search

1. Take full advantage of ad extensions for more real estate and organic-looking results. The more opportunities you can find to get users to interact with your ad, the better! Check out this example of a ski boot search to see what we’re talking about:What Every PPC Professional Should do to Prepare for 2017 via blog.adstage.io
2. Explore creating dynamic Google Display Network ads and native ads. The tools available to create responsive ads continue to reduce the barrier to entry for marketers. All you need is a short headline, description, and some images to upload and you’re off to the races. Google will take care of resizing your ad to fit the page on which it will be served.

3. Test audience targeting in Search, for instance bidding higher for a specific age range or gender that might be best served by your product. Matt Umbro encourages PPC professionals to think past keywords and to really think holistically about audiences to stay ahead of the game.

Social

1. Social community managers need to learn how to sponsor their best content against the right audience. This means getting a really good handle on the paid side of their networks, which not all community managers have necessarily needed to do until now. There are lots of great training resources out there, so if you’re not a paid social expert, take some time this year to get up to speed.What Every PPC Professional Should do to Prepare for 2017 via blog.adstage.io
2. Invest in social listening, monitoring, and analytics tools to increase and prove social ROI. 61% of social marketers see measuring ROI as a challenge, and if you can’t measure how your social investments are doing, you’ll be stuck in that challenging spot for another long year.What Every PPC Professional Should do to Prepare for 2017 via blog.adstage.io
3. Experiment with new mediums such as bots and live video. Doing so now will allow you to take advantage of the lower competition costs, greater reach, and higher engagement rates than standard ad units.

AdTech

1. Think of organizing your campaign and ad sets into campaigns by objective, across networks, as opposed to taking a network-centric approach to optimization. Find a true multi-channel tool that will allow you to create this kind of management structure, and valuable, high-level view of your PPC activity.

2. Align your re-marketing campaigns into sequences with different ad creative triggered by last visit, conversion step, or lead status. Check out this handy graphic for some examples:What Every PPC Professional Should do to Prepare for 2017 via blog.adstage.io

3. Either through scripts or 3rd party solutions, PPC marketers should automate their most mundane tasks — such as budget pacing, pausing underperforming keywords/ads/ad groups/sets — instead focusing their time on budget allocation, campaign strategy, audience targeting, and copy testing. We’re biased here, but with Automate, our 2700+ users saved over 144 weeks of full-time man hours in 2016! Think of what you and your team could do with that kind of freed up time.

4. For B2B organizations, standing up an attribution model is key to determining if ad performance at the network, campaign, and ad level are having an impact on actual revenue. It’s time to optimize past cost per conversions (lead) and instead make optimization decisions based on return on ad spend (ROAS). Platforms like Bizible, and ad tech companies who are opening their APIs are great places to turn to get this going.


Want to go even deeper? View the full webinar recording or click through the SlideShare below to get the full presentation!


 

Need another set of eyes on your PPC account? Hanapin has a building full of experts who are happy to help. Click here to see if you qualify for a free account analysis.

[The PPC Show] Episode 36: Luke Alley, Director of PPC at Avalaunch Media

[The PPC Show] Episode 36: Luke Alley, Director of PPC at Avalaunch Media

Luke Alley: The Rising Star in PPC Marketing

Luke Alley, Director of PPC at Avalaunch Media talks with us about lead gen, tracking, and optimizing for quality leads.

Named one of the rising stars in PPC Marketing by Search Engine Land, Luke has started and grown the PPC division for two companies from a handful of small clients to several million dollars managed annually. His focus has been on client acquisition, client retention, PPC management, process development, hiring and training, and being active in the PPC community through speaking, blogging, and #PPCChat. Follow him at @LukeAlley.

Enjoy the episode!

 

 

[The PPC Show] Episode 35: David Szetela, Pay-Per-Click Search Engine Marketing Author & Speaker

Posted by on Dec 20, 2016 in Social, The PPC Show [Podcast] | No Comments
[The PPC Show] Episode 35: David Szetela, Pay-Per-Click Search Engine Marketing Author & Speaker

David Szetela Shares 5 Tips for Optimizing Adwords Campaigns and a Free Book!

This week on The PPC Show David Szetela, speaker and author of “Pay-Per-Click Search Engine Marketing: An Hour a Day” shares his top tips for optimizing AdWords campaigns.

Having been voted Top PPC Expert in a poll of thousands of PPC managers and website owners, published on MediaPost, Search Engine Watch, Search Engine Land and MarketingSherpa, and of course, lauded for his two books (Customers Now and PPC Advertising on One Hour a Day), David is one of the leading PPC thought leaders today. Hit play to hear his Adwords tips, as well as discussions of the latest trends in the world of PPC marketing. One episode not enough? Follow him on twitter 👉 @Szetela.

Bonus with this episode: David has offered to give listeners of this podcast a free PDF copy of his book! Simply email David@fmbmedia.com to request that PDF!

 

[The PPC Show] Episode 34: Khalid Saleh, CEO of Invesp

Posted by on Dec 15, 2016 in Search, Social, The PPC Show [Podcast] | No Comments
[The PPC Show] Episode 34: Khalid Saleh, CEO of Invesp

Khalid Saleh talks A/B testing best practices to drive growth and profit

In this episode of The PPC Show, we chat A/B testing and conversion rate optimization (CRO) best practices with best-selling author and CEO of Invesp, Khalid Saleh.

Invesp is a leading provider of conversion optimization software and services. Khalid is at the helm, having written his Amazon.com best-selling book, “Conversion Optimization: The Art and Science of Converting Prospects into Customers.” In his book, Khalid offers a sound method to capture more customers through a fully integrated marketing strategy.  He demonstrates how the six marketing principles: customer persona, trust and confidence, buying stages, engagement, fears/uncertainties/doubts (FUDs), and incentives define the success of all types of marketing initiatives, from websites to policy strategies.

As a frequent guest on media outlets like CNN, BBC, SKY, France 24, MSNBC, New York Times, National Public Radio, and in-demand keynote conference speaker, Khalid inspires audiences to rethink their approach to marketing in terms of exponential growth and profit.

We hope he does the same for you in this podcast. Enjoy!

 

 

P.S. Like what you heard in this episode? Follow Khalid on Twitter to keep the conversation going! 👉@khalidh